Contact

Dr. Hannelore Hämmerle

Press Officer
Phone:+49 89 30000-3980
Email:pr@...

Lange Nacht 2015

On Saturday, 27 June, the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) opened its doors for visitors from 6 p.m. until midnight. Everybody was cordially invited to get to know our work and staff during the <em>&ldquo;Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften</em>&rdquo;. We presented our research and introduced the instruments and methods we use to study the physics of the universe.

Open House

On Saturday, 27 June, the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) opened its doors for visitors from 6 p.m. until midnight. Everybody was cordially invited to get to know our work and staff during the “Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften”. We presented our research and introduced the instruments and methods we use to study the physics of the universe. [more]

Upcoming Events

Events

Welcome to the MPE

MPE Research News

<div>
<p>The Milky Way&rsquo;s bar is longer, thinner, and ends closer to the Sun than previously thought. Combining several large stellar surveys, scientists at the MPE have now mapped the complete inner region of our Galaxy, containing the majority of its stars.</p>
</div>

One long
Milky Way bar

May 21, 2015

The Milky Way’s bar is longer, thinner, and ends closer to the Sun than previously thought. Combining several large stellar surveys, scientists at the MPE have now mapped the complete inner region of our Galaxy, containing the majority of its stars.

[more]
A systematic study of all massive galaxy clusters in the local universe provides information on the lightest elementary particles: Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics analysed an X-ray catalogue to show that there is less structure in the universe today than what is expected from the cosmic microwave background observations of the very early universe. This discrepancy can be explained, if the three neutrino families have an overall mass of about half an electron-volt.

Tiny particles deform large-scale structure

March 10, 2015

A systematic study of all massive galaxy clusters in the local universe provides information on the lightest elementary particles: Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics analysed an X-ray catalogue to show that there is less structure in the universe today than what is expected from the cosmic microwave background observations of the very early universe. This discrepancy can be explained, if the three neutrino families have an overall mass of about half an electron-volt. [more]
<p>An international team of astrophysicists has witnessed a unique event: for the first time, researchers have discovered the formation of a quadruple star system from widely separated fragments of a filamentary gas cloud in the Perseus constellation.</p>

Birth of a star quartet

February 10, 2015

An international team of astrophysicists has witnessed a unique event: for the first time, researchers have discovered the formation of a quadruple star system from widely separated fragments of a filamentary gas cloud in the Perseus constellation.

[more]
<p>Recent observations of the galaxy cluster RXCJ2359.5-6042 with the XMM-Newton space observatory reveal evidence for an ongoing merger that strips the smaller system of much of its gas. The analysis of the data by MPE scientists, however, also shows that the compact core of the infalling cluster has survived this encounter so far. </p>

Collision of two galaxy clusters

January 15, 2015

Recent observations of the galaxy cluster RXCJ2359.5-6042 with the XMM-Newton space observatory reveal evidence for an ongoing merger that strips the smaller system of much of its gas. The analysis of the data by MPE scientists, however, also shows that the compact core of the infalling cluster has survived this encounter so far.

[more]
<p>In November, astronomers at the MPE presented new observations of the gas cloud G2 in the galactic centre originally discovered in 2011. These data are in remarkably good agreement with an on-going tidal disruption. As a complete surprise came the discovery that the orbit of G2 matches that of another gas cloud detected a decade ago, suggesting that G2 might actually be part of a much more extensive gas streamer.</p>

Gas cloud is part of gas streamer

November 24, 2014

In November, astronomers at the MPE presented new observations of the gas cloud G2 in the galactic centre originally discovered in 2011. These data are in remarkably good agreement with an on-going tidal disruption. As a complete surprise came the discovery that the orbit of G2 matches that of another gas cloud detected a decade ago, suggesting that G2 might actually be part of a much more extensive gas streamer.

[more]
An international research team led by scientists from the CRC 956 &ldquo;Conditions and Impact of Star Formation&rdquo; has used observations with SOFIA and APEX to date the core of an interstellar cloud that is forming a group of Sun-like stars. This work, to which scientists from the MPE contributed, is published in this week&rsquo;s Nature journal.

Astrochemical dating of a stellar nursery

November 17, 2014

An international research team led by scientists from the CRC 956 “Conditions and Impact of Star Formation” has used observations with SOFIA and APEX to date the core of an interstellar cloud that is forming a group of Sun-like stars. This work, to which scientists from the MPE contributed, is published in this week’s Nature journal. [more]
 
loading content