Contact

profile_image
Dr. Hannelore Hämmerle
MPE Press Officer
Phone:+49 89 30000 3980Fax:+49 89 30000 3569
Email:pr@...

Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik

MPE Press Releases (2005 - ....)

Teaser image horizontal 1368019103

Fermi/GBM Detects Brightest Gamma-Ray Burst in Decades

May 10, 2013
The Gamma-ray burst Monitor (GBM) onboard NASA’s Fermi satellite detected a very intense signal on 27 April from the brightest Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) in decades. Several other space-based instruments including Fermi’s main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), discovered this event simultaneously. The GRB lasted so long that a record number of telescopes on the ground were able to catch it while space-based observations were still ongoing. The event is labeled GRB 130427A, indicating its date of occurrence.   [more]
Teaser image horizontal 1359619828

Protoplanetary disk around TW Hydrae outweighs previous estimates

January 31, 2013
Using the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel Space Telescope, astronomers have used a new method to measure the mass of the protoplanetary disk around the nearby young star TW Hydrae. Focussing on hydrogen’s heavier sibling deuterium, Ewine van Dishoeck from the University of Leiden, The Netherlands, and MPE Garching, in an international collaboration led by Edwin Bergin from the University of Michigan and including Thomas Henning from MPIA Heidelberg, determined that the disk has a mass equivalent to 50 times that of Jupiter, which makes it several times more massive than the primordial disk that gave birth to our Solar System. [more]
Teaser image horizontal 1355324049

Brilliant X-ray source in Andromeda galaxy identified as stellar mass microquasar

December 13, 2012
The Nova monitoring campaign in our neighbouring Andromeda galaxy yielded an extremely bright X-ray source, XMMU J004243.6+412519. Follow-up observations at radio wavelengths point at the existence of an energetic jet of particles ejected by the massive central object. This indicates that this source is indeed powered by a stellar-mass black hole gaining mass at a high rate, close to the theoretical maximum. By monitoring and analysing both the emission from the accretion disk and the material ejected in the jet, the astronomers can learn more about the processes around a stellar mass black hole. [more]
Teaser image vertical 1355311021

24-armed Giant to Probe Early Lives of Galaxies

December 12, 2012
First light for KMOS instrument [more]
Teaser image vertical 1343051272

John Kormendy appointed External Scientific Member of MPE

July 24, 2012
The Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics is delighted to announce that Prof John Kormendy of the Astronomy Department of the University of Texas at Austin has been appointed an External Scientific Member of MPE. John Kormendy is world famous for his work on the structure and dynamics of galaxies as well as for his search for supermassive black holes in galaxy centres. He holds the prestigious Curtis T. Vaughn Chair in Astrophysics at the University of Texas at Austin and is an Associate Editor of the Annual Review in Astronomy and Astrophysics, the premier review publication in Astronomy. [more]
Teaser image vertical 1340184760

Looking into the dark: Ahead with the Euclid mission

June 20, 2012
On 19. June, the European Space Agency (ESA) formally adopted the largest collaboration of astronomers in the World, including scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics to help build the Euclid satellite. Euclid will study the ``Dark Universe” with great precision, tracing the distribution and evolution of the enigmatic dark matter and dark energy throughout the Universe. [more]
Teaser image vertical 1339764850

How interstellar beacons could help future spacecraft find their way across the universe

April 12, 2012
The use of stars, planets and stellar constellations for navigation was of fundamental importance for mankind for thousands of years. Now a group of scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching have developed a new navigation technique using the periodic signatures of neutron stars. With this method, future spacecraft will be able to navigate across the universe - independently from Earth. Team member Prof. Werner Becker presented their work at the National Astronomy Meeting in Manchester end of March. [more]
 
loading content